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Faculty Qualifications: An Exploration of AACSB Faculty Data

June 2012

By Jessica Brown, Senior Manager, Knowledge Services, AACSB Internationa

The question of finding qualified faculty is not only influenced by a school's need for good educators, but also by the right balance of experience in both academic and professional settings. According to AACSB Accreditation, this kind of balance is based on the academic and professional qualification requirements within the accreditation standards and a school's individual definitions. In order to track changes in academically qualified (AQ) and professionally qualified (PQ) faculty structures at AACSB member schools, six years ago AACSB International added a question related to faculty qualification type to its annual Global Salary Survey.

In the following tables and charts, a controlled set of 395 schools that participated in all years have been listed. The data has been limited to only full-time faculty, as reported on AACSB's annual Global Salary Survey. While it is not surprising that academically qualified faculty comprise more than 80 percent of the overall faculty counts, it is interesting to note that the AQ percentage has only decreased at the faculty rank of instructor, beginning at 35.1 percent in 2006–07, but declining to 29.2 percent in 2011–12. At all other faculty ranks, the percentage of faculty classified as AQ has increased.

Figure 1. Percent of Faculty by Rank and Qualification Type: 2006–07 to Present


(Source: AACSB International. Global Salary Survey. Controlled set including only schools that participated in all years listed. Percents may not equal 100 percent due to faculty reported as "neither" or "unknown" qualification types.)

Figure 2.


(Source: AACSB International. Global Salary Survey. Controlled set including only schools that participated in all years listed. Percents may not equal 100 percent due to faculty reported as "neither" or "unknown" qualification types.)

Figure 3. Percent of Faculty Reported as Unknown or Neither AQ/PQ: 2006-07 to Present

With both AQ and PQ on the rise, the question is what categories are showing decreases? In all cases, the percentage of full-time faculty reported as "unknown" or as "neither AQ or PQ" has steadily decreased each year. Whether this is indicative of a change in hiring practices or of better AQ/PQ tracking at business schools it is unclear. In any case, the overall trend for faculty reported without AQ or PQ designations has continued to fall.


(Source: AACSB International. Global Salary Survey. Controlled set including only schools that participated in all years listed.)

Whether or not your business school has experienced this same type of trend, considering your AQ/PQ mix carefully to foster a solid and strong faculty community with both academic and business experience provides an ongoing opportunity to bring the best education possible to your students and encourage innovative ways of combining different areas of expertise into your business school.